About the Valley Preferred Cycling Center

Valley Preferred Cycling Center proudly represents the cycling capital of the United States and home to cycling in the Lehigh Valley. Our Velodrome is world famous and the roads in the Trexlertown area are known for being some of the best by cyclists worldwide. We host the world’s premiere weekly racing series each summer, as well as national championships large group rides, charity rides, cyclo-cross events, and much more. Simply put, Valley Preferred Cycling Center is your go to destination for cycling.

T-Town, a nickname derived from our location in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania, is our brand and how the world knows us. T-Town is the most famous cycling brand on the planet and has been home to the best field of international cycling competitors each summer for the past four decades.

A facility owned by the Lehigh Valley, Valley Preferred Cycling Center is leased to and managed by the Velodrome Fund, Inc.—a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

The mission and vision of Valley Preferred Cycling Center is to provide the Lehigh Valley and its citizens with health and wellness-oriented programs and services in a clean, safe park setting.

Valley Preferred Cycling Center
Valley Preferred Cycling Center

A Velodrome is a cycling track, made of wood or concrete, consisting of banked turns on either side and connected by two straightaways. Riders use fixed gear bikes, with no brakes, to compete in a variety of individual and team races.

Valley Preferred Cycling Center’s Velodrome features 28 degree banked turns, with straightaways banked at 12 degrees. Our Velodrome is a 333 meter long concrete track, known for being one of the fastest outdoor tracks in the world by its degree of banking. Rather than steep banked turns, the 28 degree banked turns allow our riders to gain greater speed when coming out of the turns.

About Our Facility

Valley Preferred Cycling Center caters to any size event. Whether hosting the world’s best cyclists or renting the track to a private group, Valley Preferred Cycling Center offers everything you need.

In addition to an event at Valley Preferred Cycling Center, Rodale Park is available for rental through the Lehigh County Parks Department.

Concessions:
The Valley Preferred Cycling Center offers the Breakaway Cafe*, which is located in the plaza. The Breakaway Cafe offers an assortment of delicious food and beverage options for the T-town fans. Some options available at the Breakaway Cafe include the usual sporting event favorites like hot dogs, french fries, chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, pierogies, wraps and more.

Additionally, the Beer and Wine Stand is conveniently located right next to the Breakaway Cafe in the plaza. It offers a great variety of both beer and also features Clover Hill Wine, which is a local company. Every Super Tuesday race features a “Happy Tuesday” special which gives a special sale which runs all night long. Every World Series of Bicycling event features a Happy Hour special which gives a special sale that runs only from 6pm-7pm.

The Breakaway Cafe also provides the catering for all hospitality parties at the Valley Preferred Cycling Center, which includes the VeloDeck and the Infield Party Area. The menu includes a wide variety of fresh, homemade entrees, sides and desserts.

In addition to concession items, Valley Preferred Cycling Center offers VIP groups and parties a catering menu consisting of a wide variety of fresh, homemade entrees, sides, and desserts.

*Please note: The Breakaway Cafe as well as Beer and Wine Stand are not open during the Masters & Rookies Racing Series held every Saturday Afternoon.

Parking: Valley Preferred Cycling Center offers ample, free parking adjacent the facility. Rodale Park’s parking lot, as well as the fields next to Valley Preferred Cycling Center, can be rented to accommodate parking.

Restrooms and Locker Rooms: Valley Preferred Cycling Center has 4 restroom locations in the plaza area, along with both a men’s and women’s locker room. Our facilities provide guests with plenty of locker space, ample sinks, and changing stations for babies.

Ticket Office and Will Call: Hosting an event that requires check-in? Take advantage of two separate ticket booths at the enterence. The larger ticket office features 5 windows for registrants or guests to use, while the will call booth offers one window, making it perfect for smaller events. Cash registers are not available.

Public Address System and Music: Valley Preferred Cycling Center offers a wireless microphone system connected to our loudspeakers, allowing you to communicate throughout the facility. Play music through our state of the art sound system to get everyone excited.

Grandstands: Gather your guests in one spot on our massive grandstands. Our grandstands are a great place to address your group or party, and an even better place to watch the action.

Infield: Measuring 300+ feet in diameter, the infield at Valley Preferred Cycling Center is massive. It is large enough to play host to an all-day music festival and still have room!

Host your cycling event on the world renowned track at Valley Preferred Cycling Center for an extra attraction. Interested in renting the facility? Contact Us!

Our Team

Marty Nothstein, Valley Preferred Cycling Center Executive Director

Marty Nothstein

Executive Director

mnothstein@thevelodrome.com

About Marty

Marty is an Olympic champion, an Olympic silver medalist and a three-time world champion in Sprint and Keirin. With an 18-year career in bicycle racing coming to a close in 2006, Marty stepped down from his role as the greatest track cyclist in the modern American era and into the history books. Born and bred in the Lehigh Valley, he has always called T-town and the Valley Preferred Cycling Center home and is truly enthusiastic about his opportunity to give back to cycling through his efforts as Executive Director.

A dedication to the Olympic Ideal allowed Marty to train and race at a level that granted unwavering consistency and unmatched results in multiple disciplines. Upon winning Olympic gold in Sydney, Australia, Marty transitioned from sprinting to professional road racing as an integral member of the Navigators Professional Cycling Team.

As Executive Director Marty is fulfilling his personal and heartfelt obligation to help steer American track cycling and the Valley Preferred Cycling Center back into medal contention. His presence at the track brings instant credibility and professionalism to the world’s premier outdoor cycling venue.

Juliann Masenheimer - Valley Preferred Cycling Center Events and Communications Manager

Juliann Masenheimer

Events and Communications Manager

jmasenheimer@thevelodrome.com

About Juliann

Juliann is a professional graphic designer who has specialized in corporate communications throughout the Lehigh Valley for fifteen years. Her extensive experience includes creative work for clients like Wendy’s, Dixie Cup and Coordinated Health.

She has also played an integral role in the implementation and activation behind her design, which was developed for consumer events and corporate hospitality. Her talents extend to consumer promotion and advertising, corporate re-branding and identity, employee communications, exhibit graphics, and public and media relations and events.

Combining her life’s work as a designer with her passion of events and athletics, she has created a lifestyle and culture that pairs well with the Valley Preferred Cycling Center.

Tyler Trumbauer - Valley Preferred Cycling Center Public Relations and Communications Assistant

Tyler Trumbauer

Public Relations and Communications Assistant

ttrumbauer@thevelodrome.com

About Tyler

Tyler is a young, up and coming individual in the communications field who already has a lifetime of experience. He began as a published journalist at the age of 15 covering high school sports in the northern part of the Lehigh Valley region for the Town & Country Gazette. He has been published in multiple publications including The Morning Call and the Times News, based in Lehighton, Pennsylvania.

Tyler gained a lot of experience while attending Edinboro University where he studied journalism and public relations while serving as Sports Editor for the campus newspaper, Sports Director for the campus television station and Sports Director for the campus radio station. Also, he was a part of the T-town team for the 2015 racing season as a PR/Communications Intern.

Having interviewed everyone from a festival goer to an Olympic gold medalist, Tyler has an expansive amount of communications experience that coupled with his love for sports looks to fit in perfectly at T-town where he hopes to spread the news about what is happening in the Bicycle Racing Capital of the World.

Our Board of Directors

Officers/Executive Committee 2016

NamePosition
Andy Ralston, Esq.Chairperson
Heidi RodaleVice Chairperson
Laura MertzSecretary
Lois ArciszewskiController
Paul Mack, CPA, CFETreasurer

Lifetime Honorary Members

Jack Parmer
Ardath Rodale
Tom Stoneback

Board of Directors

Directors
Andy Ralston, Esq.
Laura Mertz
Heidi Rodale
Brian Leader
Carol Michaels
Dr. Thomas Meade
Lois Arciszewski
Dr. Neil Stansbury
Ken Remick
Zack Grice
Everette Carr
Hon. Michael Schware, CPA
Rick Beuttel
Luke Jaindl
Paul Mack, CPA, CFE

Our History

Valley Preferred Cycling Center – Bob Rodale’s Dream Inspires Countless Champions For Nearly Four Decades.

Early History
Valley Preferred Cycling Center is the most celebrated velodrome in modern American cycling history – can trace its beginnings to the dream of one inspired visionary and its history2legendary success to the inspired dreams of countless champions who began their trek to glory on its 333-meter track.

history2

Robert Rodale

Known for the first 20 years of its existence as the Lehigh County Velodrome – or simply T-Town, as it is affectionately referred to by the national and international racers who make it their home here each summer – the concrete crater in a corn field was the idea of publisher Bob Rodale. Rodale fell in love with track cycling while competing as an Olympic and Pan American games skeet shooter in the 1960s. The president of Rodale Press, and later publisher of Bicycling and Mountain Bike magazines, knew in his heart that the excitement and colorful action of this healthful sport could capture the interest of Americans.

Rodale was a visionary but he was also a practical businessman. He made sure his dream was built to last by consulting with numerous national and international cycling organizations, racers and knowledgeable contractors. Construction began in 1974 on a plot of land in Trexlertown, PA, owned by Bob Rodale and his wife, Ardath. As the work progressed and the track took shape, Rodale worked with community leaders to create programs such as the Air Products Developmental Cycling Program that would spark a local interest in bicycle racing. He also donated his land and the partially completed facility to Lehigh County in return for a pledge that the county would continue to support development of the track and its programs.

Rodale reached out to two of the most celebrated cyclists of the 1960s and 1970s – Jack Simes III and David Chauner – to bring his dream to life. Working with the late Artie Greenburg and announcer Brian Drebber, Simes and Chauner launched an immediate effort to attract top international cyclists and events, creating a foundation that has made Valley Preferred Cycling Center the most active and successful velodrome in the United States.

The first race was held on October 12, 1975. In the early years of Lehigh County Velodrome, there were no locker rooms, rest rooms, or bleachers, there wasn’t even a railing at the top of the track. From those early days when Jerry “The Gentle Giant” Ash and Leigh “The Tree” Barczewski and his brother Les, along with cycling greats such as Gil “Gibby” Hatton and women riders such as Sheila Young and Connie Paraskevin reignited the sport of track racing in the United States, Rodale’s dream did catch the imagination of the American cycling public.

Simes and Chauner were followed by equally imaginative and talented leaders, from Leigh and Karen Barczewski to Pat McDonough and Marty Nothstein, and the concrete crater continues to produce world-class competitors and events.

Since the mid-1970s, Valley Preferred Cycling Center has hosted World Cups, Olympic Trials, the Junior World Championships (twice), National Championships and countless major international competitions, creating stars and producing top international competitors, such as former Junior World Sprint Champion Sarah Uhl, who won her title in a dramatic finish during last race of the event before a cheering hometown crowd.

Over the years T-Town has endeared itself to the racers as much as the racers have endeared themselves to the crowds. Riders such as Uhl and the late Nicole Reinhart hold special places in track memory along with past luminaries Shaun Wallace of England and Paul “The Animal” Pearson of Allentown and heroes of today, such as World Championship Silver Medalist Ashley Kimmet of Allentown and multiple National Champion Bobby Lea of Mertztown.

Olympic History
Without a doubt the greatest of them all is Marty Nothstein, a local kid who graduated from the Air Products Developmental Cycling Program, and the Red Robin Marty

Marty Nothstein Olympic Cycling Champion

Marty Nothstein celebrates a gold medal victory in the 2000 Olympic Games

Nothstein Bicycle Racing League that now bears his name. Nothstein went on to win Olympic Gold, Olympic Silver, three World Championships and more than 30 U.S. National Championships during his 15-year career. He is now the Executive Director of the Valley Preferred Cycling Center, where he works to continue the great programs and events that have made T-Town an international destination for the world’s best track cyclists.

During the course of Nothstein’s career, and in large part due to his international success, Valley Preferred Cycling Center also gained powerful and influential allies that have helped it remain the premier velodrome in the United States. In 1995 the facilities were rebuilt to add new grandstands that hold 2,000 fans, new shower and locker facilities for the athletes, top-notch restroom facilities for the fans, and a world-class concession stand that offers value-priced food and beverages for the cycling enthusiasts who trek to the track several nights a week during the racing season.

Renamed the Lehigh Valley Velodrome when those renovations were completed, it hosted former Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge, who took a Friday night lap around the track in front of the fans during one of his annual cycling excursions around the commonwealth, and cycling legends such as Greg LeMond and Bobby Julich have been known to show up at the bi-annual bicycle swap meets that draw thousands of cyclists from all over the East Coast.

Though Bob Rodale’s life was tragically cut short in a 1990 automobile accident in Russia, his dream lives on through the support of his wife, Ardath, his family and Rodale Inc., along with the community support that has continued because of Bob Rodale’s early efforts to build a cycling facility that would become a prized icon of the Lehigh Valley.

Today
The velodrome is now managed by a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation that continues to promote track cycling – just the way Bob wanted it. Thanks to the generosity of Valley Preferred, a community partnership of doctors and hospitals, the renamed Valley Preferred Cycling Center continues to lead the nation in quality competition, championship racer development and community programs that offer the opportunity for racers and nonacers to enjoy the thrill of bicycle track racing in the nation’s most-loved and most-successful velodromes in modern American cycling.

Our Hall of Fame

2003

2003 Hall of Fame

Robert Rodale

Robert Rodale

Robert Rodale
Publisher, humanitarian, visionary, Bob Rodale was a renaissance man. The only word that comes to mind to capture his his essence is “Passion.” An Olympic skeet shooter for the U.S., Bob was introduced to track cycling while competing in the 1967 Pan American Games and immediately fell in love with the sport. Bob fulfilled his dream as an Olympic skeet shooter and then devoted his time to feeding the dreams of others. He helped transform the Lehigh Valley into a mecca of cycling. His vision of a world-class Velodrome in the Lehigh Valley has become a reality. He built it and they came. They developed and continue to grow. His dream has helped in the discovery and development of Olympians and Olympic Champions.
Ardath Rodale

Ardath Rodale

Ardath Rodale
With her husband, Bob, providing the initial vision, Ardath “Ardie” Rodale has continued his dream on a grand scale as a generous supporter and corporate angel. Under Ardie’s leadership, the Velodrome underwent a multi-million dollar expansion that included expanded seating grandstands, the Velodeck, athlete locker rooms and a spacious plaza area for family-style fun and entertainment. The staging of the 1996 Olympic Trials, the 1997 World Cup and the 2001 Junior World Championships all came under Ardie’s watch. Her quiet and unassuming manner behind the scenes allowed the Velodrome team and the riders to remain at the top of the podium. And when asked about her contributions, she always speaks of Bob’s dream and vision. For all this, the velodrome is eternally grateful.
Jerry Ash

Jerry Ash

Jerry Ash
Jerry Ash, “the Gentle Giant,” gave the Velodrome personality. A dominant rider here from the track’s inception, Jerry was the first true star of the Velodrome despite picking up the sport at the late age of 23. California native’s giant stature (6 foot 4 inches) was more than matched by his giant heart. More than any other rider, he was directly responsible for the success of the Air Products Developmental Program. he took it as a personal mission to give back to the sport b not only coaching the program in its initial years, but by also taking a personal interest in the novice riders.
Leigh Barczewski

Leigh Barczewski

Leigh Barczewski
Pennsylvania is a long bike ride from his home state of Wisconsin, but Leigh Barczewski traveled here at the inception of the Velodrome and has made the Lehigh Valley his home. He has played every role from rider to director, along with a new role in advising aspiring cyclists. From the start, he believed in Bob Rodale’s philosophy of preparing for life after competition and upon retiring from riding in 1980, he immediately took over the role of Technical Director for the track. Leigh also saw the worth of the Air Products Developmental Programs and helped them grow. Known as “The Tree” in his racing days, Lehigh earned an Olympic Team berth in 1976.
Karen Bliss

Karen Bliss

Karen Bliss
Karen Bliss was that rare talent that comes along once in a generation. She entered the world of cycling at a relatively late age. A dedicated sports nut through her scholastic years at Quakertown, Karen found cycling at Penn State University and quickly excelled at the sport. She was the first local woman to earn the role of “star” and won a U.S. national points race title in her first full season on the track. She ended her career as a road rider, but she endeared herself to the people of T-town early with her riding and her intelligent, articulate conversations.
Danny Clark

Danny Clark

Danny Clark
Danny Clark dominated the Lehigh Valley Velodrome the way few riders have. The Rider of the Year title was not in existence from 1979 through 1981, but if it were, Clark would have earned three straight titles. He did win three straight world keirin titles from 1979 through 1981. His presence provided a true international flavor at the then young track. He was a fan favorite, especially with the ladies. His success here helped foster a strong connection for other Australian cyclists looking to make a living during the winter months “Down Under.” Legions of cyclists from Australia and New Zealand have been making “T-town” their summer home ever since Clark exhibited his world championship rainbow jerseys here.
Jane Eickhoff

Jane Eickhoff

Jane Eickhoff
Jane Eickhoff, aka “the Pocket Rocket,” won a junior world titles in the match sprint and the pursuit in her first year of competition in T-Town. Before she retired, she owned the only world record ever set at this Velodrome. Eickhoff helped raise the bar for women’s performances in Trexlertown. Her sea-level world record in the women’s kilometer in 1991 furthered the reputation of the track, which by then was world renowned as “T-town.” A California native, she blossomed into one of the top women’s international cyclists in U.S. history. Her style and effort made her an instant fan favorite here, but her smile and her sincerity made her seem like the girl next door.
Artie Greenberg

Artie Greenberg

Artie Greenberg
A renowned wheel builder, Artie Greenberg moved to the Lehigh Valley from New York City primarily because of the Velodrome. He earned a sparkling reputation as one of the first Americans to become a UCI official. In 1977 – footing the bill himself after the U.S. federation refused to pay for him – Artie flew to New Zealand, took the test for UCI commissar, and not only passed, but set a then-high score to become the youngest person ever, and the only one under the age of 30, to pass the exam. Artie met a tragic death in 1980 in a vehicular accident on Route 309. Today, the annual men’s 10-mile record attempt race at the track bears his name.
Gil Hatton

Gil Hatton

Gil Hatton
If legends are invtented, the Gil Hatton pretty much wrote the book on his own legend. His fiery personality and winning smile were a hit in the first day of the Velodrome. “The Bear”, as he was called, later turned professional and began to concentrate on the Keirin. He found his niche and dominated in this unique event, where he became the first North American ever invited to compete on the Japanese Keirin circuit. He continued his success off the track, helping to coach youngsters, including three-time world champion Marty Nothstein. He has gone in and out of retirement as a racer the past several years while continuing to coach the stars of tomorrow.
Lucy Tyler

Lucy Tyler

Lucy Tyler
The first thing Lucy Tyler did after winning a world championship in the individual pursuit in 1998 was the call her friends at the Lehigh Valley Velodrome. “It’s my home,” she claimed. Raised in Kentucky, Tyler was an up-and-coming U.S. star who couldn’t quite wind her way through the maze of obstacles the national federation seemed to throw down. She became an Australian citizen and competed for the Land Down Under, wining gold and silver medals in the world championships, plus a bronze medal at the 1996 Olympic in Atlanta. Lucy also won the track’s Rider of the Year an unprecedented five times, always saluting to the fans. She generously gives back to the sport, not only through coaching, but by helping youngsters raise money for equipment.
Shaun Wallace

Shaun Wallace

Shaun Wallace
He came from Great Britain, engineering degree in hand, to ride for Bicycling Magazine’s Madison Cup in 1980. Shaun Wallace finished last and vowed it would never happen again. He returned in 1984 to dominate the track until the rise of Marty Nothstein in the early ‘90s. His training methods were unorthodox for their time, focusing on oxygen debt and perceived rate of exertion instead of heart rates and watts, but they worked to near perfection. His good looks made him the fantasy material of many teenage girls while his eagerness to mix it up in the keirin and Madison found legions of boys eager to adapt to his tactics. He earned a tribute night at the track in 1997 and still continued to ride.
Jack Simes III

Jack Simes III

Jack Simes III
Three-time Olympian and one-time Olympic coach, Jack Simes III served as director of the track through 1978, then went on to help found U.S. Pro Cycling, becoming the president of that organization in 1980. Simes, along with his father, are members of the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame.

2004

2004 Hall of Fame

Bruce Donaghy

Bruce Donaghy

Bruce Donaghy
From Audubon, New Jersey, Bruce “The Torch” Donaghy was the 1974 road and track intermediate champion. He was the national junior kilometer and junior sprint champion in 1977, madison champion in 1979 and team pursuit champion in 1980 and 1981. he was a member of he U.S. team for the Junior Worlds in 1976 and 1977, the Worlds in 1979 and the Olympics in 1980. He was the T-town Men’s Rider of the Year in 1978 and 1984. He was a crowd favorite for many infamous battles with other fiery riders in the miss-and-out and madison events. By speaking more with his pedals than with his mouth, be’s been a role model of what a cycling and professional athlete should be. Bruce was one of the original Bicycle Racing League coaches, helping many juniors win state medals and become national-level racers. He served as a Velodrome board member as well. He continues to advise young riders, pioneering a junior scholarship program through Morgan Stanley, where he is a vice president.
Art Mchugh

Art Mchugh

Art Mchugh
From Flint, Michigan, Art “The Dart” Mchugh enjoyed delighting the T-Town crowd with his burst of speed, especially playing the devil in miss-and-out events. At the nationals in 1980, he placed third in the springs and fifth in the kilometer. In 1981, Art placed fourth in the sprints and fifth in the kilometer at nationals. After turning pro in 1983, he placed second in the U.S. championship sprints and sixth in the worlds. In 1985, he was T-Town Men’s Rider of the Year. he ten turned to announcing for a few years, becoming the favorite of many fans for his racer’s perspective in his commentary and colorful phrases like, “does he have any more suds left in those legs?” But his love of bike racing has drawn him back into competition several times when the urge strikes.
Nicole Reinhart

Nicole Reinhart

Nicole Reinhart
From Macungie, Pennsylvania, Nicole Reinhart was a home-grown cycling champion as a junior and senior and was classy in every sense of the word. In 1992, 1993 and 1994, she won three junior championships each year. In the 1993 Junior Pan-Am Games, she earned a bronze in the sprints and gold in the points race. In the 1996 Pan American Games, she won three medals – gold in the 500 meter and road race, bronze medalist in the points race. In 1997, she was national champion in the 500 meter and sprints and silver medalist in the points race. In 1998, she was silver medalist at the Nationals and Pan American Games in the 500 meter, and first overall in sprint events in the EDS track Cup series. She then switched her focus to good results on the road for her Saturn team. In 2000, after winning three events in the fourace BMC Software Grand Prix series, she was setting up for the final spring when she struck a tree and died of her injuries on September 17. In her honor, the Nicole Reinhart Memorial Fund has been established to help support young racers who share Nicole’s qualities of caring, giving back to the sport, remembering where they came from, courteous treatment of others and good sportsmanship.
Mary Jane Reoch

Mary Jane Reoch

Mary Jane Reoch
From Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Mary Jane “Miji” Reoch won the first race on opening day at T-Town and was a regular participant in its early years. She was national pursuit champion in 1973, 1974, and 1975, and also earned the silver at world in 1975. In 1978, she was both national pursuit and points race champion, and then won the points title again in 1979 and 1980. She loved cycling and it showed. “Miji” was a crowd favorite for her warm personality and her habit of entering men’s races and performing well in them. She taught cycling and was a mentor to many, including Connie Carpenter. While coaching in Texas, she was struck and killed by a pickup truck on September 11, 1993.
Hubert Schleh

Hubert Schleh

Hubert Schleh
Hailing from Germany, Hubert Schleh has been a key component in the history of the Lehigh Valley Velodrome since its inception. The longtime lap card and bell official has graced the facility with his charm, wit and sense of humor to the delight of riders and fans alike. Here is a man that dedicated his life to his passion of cycling and the Velodrome will be forever grateful.
Gordon Singleton

Gordon Singleton

Gordon Singleton
From St. Catherines, Ontario, Gordon Singleton made his mark as the fastest sprinter in North America in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s while behaving like a gentleman on and off the track. he was Canadian national sprint champion in 1977, 1979 and 1980, as well as Canadian national kilometer champion in 1979. In 1977 and 1980, Gordon placed second in the Canadian national sprints. In the Commonwealth Games in 1978, he earned a bronze in the kilometer and a gold medal in the tandem sprints. In the Pan American Games, he was a member of the Canadian team in 1975 and 1979, winning gold in both the kilometer and sprints. He was also a member of the 1976 Canadian Olympic team. Disappointed at not being able to compete in the Moscow Olympics in 1980, Gordon went to the Mexico City Velodrome in October and set three world records in two days, the 200 meters, 500 meters and kilometer. At the World Championships in 1979, he earned the silver medal in the kilometer. After turning pro, he earned the silver medal in the world pro sprints in 1981 and 1982 and the World Keirin Championship in 1982. During his racing career he was a regular participant in T-town sprint tournaments and set three track records in one night, the 200 meter, flying lap and kilometer.

2005

2005 Hall of Fame

Dave Chauner

Dave Chauner

Dave Chauner
From Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Dave Chauner was a member of the 1967 and 1971 Pan American Games teams and the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Games. From 1975 to 1978 he was the firstchauner Velodrome program coordinator, putting T-town on the world map of track cycling by bringing in stars like Eddy Merckx, Patrick Sercu and Danny Clark. He was also T-town’s first announcer, setting the style of colorfully explaining events while building up personalities of the racers. His philosophy is that people get excited about cycling by seeing top-level pros competing, which provides the inspiration needed to fuel grassoots development. He went on to co-create and promote high profile cycling events to get the sport in the public eye, like the USPRO Championships in Philadelphia and similar events in New York City and San Francisco.
Nelson Vails

Nelson Vails

Nelson Vails
From Harlem, New York, Nelson “The Cheetah” Vails was a Manhattan bicycle messenger who hooked up with the Toga Bike Shop cycling team, got invited to a U.S. Cycling Federation development camp in Colorado in 1981 and wound up an Olympian and a media personality. At the U.S. Championships her was crowned sprint champion in 1984, plus tandem champion in 1984, 1985 and 1986. He was also the 1983 Pan-American sprint champion. His crowning moment came in 1984 where he won a silver medal at the Los Angeles Olympic Games. In 1985, he turned professional and competed on the prestigious keirin circuit in Japan. During his racing career he was a regular at T-town and was truly a crowd pleaser for his outgoing personality. Now based in Colorado, he’s a television cycling commentator while also making appearance at a variety of charity events.
Leonard Harvey Nitzorig

Leonard Harvey Nitzorig

Leonard Harvey Nitzorig
Born in Hamilton, Oh., Leonard Hsrvey Nitz has been called the best all around track rider the U.S. has ever produced. From 1976 to 1989 he won more than 15 U.S. National championships, was a member of the 1979, ’83 and ’87 u.S. Pan American teams where he won two gold medals and a bronze. Also, at the World Championships he earned a silver medal in the points race in 1981 and a bronze in 1986. He was a member of every U.S. Olympic team from 1976 through 1988, earning a silver medal in the team pursuit and a bronze medal in the individual pursuit in 1984. he was a crowd favorite for his exciting “Nitz Kick” burst of speed during a points race or the final laps of a pursuit.
Jessica Grieco

Jessica Grieco photo not available

Jessica Grieco
From Emerson, N.J., Jessica Grieco represented the U.S. international as both a junior and senior with “class” and stellar results. In 1988, she was named the T-town Woman Rider of the Year. She won two junior national titles in 1988, three in 1989 and six in 1990. During her three years of participation at the Junior World Championships (1989-1991) she earned on gold, five silver and two bronze medals. After graduating to the elite ranks, she concentrated on the points race on the track, getting one gold and three silver medals at the U.S. National Championships and a bronze medal at he World Championships in 1993. As an athlete she represented her sport with the high esteem and dignity. Her personality is a plus and she has served as a guest announced on OLN during the Tour de France and has co-hosted the live television coverage for the USPRO Championships in Philadelphia for many years.

2006

2006 Hall of Fame

Alaric J. F. Gayfer

Alaric J. F. Gayfer

Alaric J. F. Gayfer
From London, England, Alaric “The Guv” Gayfer was a seven-time British national track champion. With his vast knowledge of cycling and pure love of the sport. ‘The Guv” turned to helping others as a coach and a mechanic. He was the head coach of the Air Products Developmental Cycling Programs at the Lehigh Valley Velodrome for 10 years. He was director sportif of the Future Champions of Cycling Club and the East Coast Velo Cycling Club. Using his booming voice and wicked sense of humor, he had words of encouragement and wisdom for riders of all ages and abilities. But he especially enjoyed getting kids started in cycling, always scrounging bikes, parts and cycling outfits for them and having a profound impact on their development on and off the bike. Sadly, he lost his last race, against brain cancer, in June 2004 at the age of 47.
Curtis Harnett

Curtis Harnett

Curtis Harnett
Thunder Bay, Ontario’s Curt Harnett capped a stellar international career with five Olympic and world championship medals in tandem with a world record in the 200m time trial of 9.865 seconds. A Trexlertown regular during his formidable years, Harnett Broke the Lehigh Valley Velodrome’s 200m record three times, all the while upholding his rock star persona and well-earned reputation as a great showman on and off the bike.
Paul Pearson

Paul Pearson

Paul Pearson
From Bethesda, Maryland, Paul “The Animal” Pearson was a photographer who went from taking pictures of cycling friends, to training with them, to becoming a fierce competitor who could race with the best on both the road and the track. He was Maryland State Track Champion for three years in the late 1970’s, 1979 Tour De Moore Champion in North Carolina and Eastern Regional “Best All-Round” champion in 1980. “The Animal” turned pro in 1981. That same year, he was third in the Tasmanian 6-day event and in 1984 was a member of the PRO team for the Tour of America. In 1984, he won the Keystone Open In Philadelphia, in 1985 the Winston Salem criterium, in 1987 the Tour of Somerville and in 1929 he was the U.S. Points Race Champion and three-time Master Track Champion. He made top 10 in Lehigh Country Velodrome rider of the year every year from 1978 through 1987, ranking as high as second on several occasions.
Nelson Saldana

Nelson Saldana

Nelson Saldana
From Kew Gardens, New York, Nelson “The Rabbit” Saldana was the national intermediate champion in 1969 and national junior champion in 1972. In 1974 he was a member of the U.S. worlds team. In 1975, he was fourth in the kilometer at nationals and a member of the Pan Am gold-medal winning pursuit team. In 1976, Saldana was second in the nationals 10-mile race and in 1977 champion in the first nationals points race. That year he also became part of the Trexlertown Express “home team,” along with Jerry Ash, Leigh Barczewski, Gibby Hatton and Bob Vehe, and coached in the developmental program. He was called the flashiest competitor, noted for breakaway speeds in the sprints and excellent bike handling, and had the biggest fan following. He was ranked second behind Ash in the standings in the 1977 Alf Goullet Trophy, equivalent to rider of the year. He went on to become a New York state trooper and has been recognized for his underwater investigative work as part of the scuba diving unit.

2007

2007 Hall of Fame

No Entries

2008

2008 Hall of Fame

Patrick Gellineau

Patrick Gellineau

Patrick Gellineau
Patrick Gellineau, originally from the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago, was a national champion in his native land and represented his home country in the 1972 Olympics before moving to New York City and becoming a United States citizen. After construction of the new Trexlertown Velodrome in 1975, Patrick became a Friday night regular known for his stamina, skill and competitiveness in the Madison and points races. An amicable, yet fierce and savvy racer, competitors and fans alike soon learned that Patrick was the undisputed champion of the last-lap surprises, often succeeding in out-jumping his opponents in the final lap. His many victories on the Concrete Crater earned him the nickname “Master of Mad Dash.” After hanging up his cleats in elite racing, Patrick continued his winning ways in age-graded track cycling competitions by winning a gold medal in the Men’s 50-54 spring in the 2003 U.S. Masters Track Cycling Championships and a silver medial in the Men’s 55-59 Points Race at the 2008 UCI World Masters Track Cycling Championships.
Mark Whitehead

Mark Whitehead

Mark Whitehead
Originally from Whittier, California, Mark “The Outlaw” Whitehead was one of the most ferocious and cunning riders to ever toe the line in T-Town. Taught the skills and tactics of racing by his cycling father, Pete Whitehead, Mark often dueled head-to-head in thrilling elbow-to-elbow finished against the best riders in the world, earning a reputation as a fiery competitor with a winner-take-all mentality. An authentic all-around racer, Mark’s ability to win across the full spectrum of track cycling events allowed him to become one of the only cyclists in American history to earn national titles in the junior, elite and masters ranks. Throughout his career, Mark won numerous national championships, including titles in the 1981 Madison, the 1983 kilometer time trial and Madison, the 1984 points race, back-to-back team pursuits in 1984 and 1985 and the national professional sprint title in 1986. He represented the United States in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles and at the 1993 World Championships in Zurich, Switzerland and won over 100 races in Trexlertown.

2009

2009 Hall of Fame

Andy Taus

Andy Taus

Andy Taus
Andy, a lifetime Allentown resident, was an active racer from 1968 through 1974. During that time, with friend Phil Petrick, Andy advised, encouraged and provided research for Bob Rodale to move forward with building our Velodrome. However, it would be after obtaining his officials’s license in 1972 that Andy would pursue his most-focused direction in cycling. From that day forth, his legacy would span from a local club official to the highest plateaus of officiating in the world. In 1990, Andy became a Grade-A International Cycling Union (UCI) Commissaire. In that capacity, Andy has worked many of the world’s most prestigious cycling competitions such as World Road and Track Championships and Olympic, Pan American and Goodwill games, as well as the majority of the USA’s high profile races. In addition to officiating, Andy previously served as the Technical Director of Governing Body, USPRO, in charge of writing and adapting regulations and assigning officials for all USPRO sanctioned racing. he has also been a a successful organizer of track, road and cyclecross events.
Jeff Rutter

Jeff Rutter

Jeff Rutter
A native of Orwigsurg, Pennsylvania, Jeff “The Rocket” Rutter began his racing career at the age of 16 after attending a developmental cycling clinic at the Valley Preferred Cycling Center in 1977. His racing success started immediately, as Jeff won two junior national titles and represented the U.S. as a member of two junior world teams. That success followed him to the pro ranks. In 1980 and 1981, Jeff was a national champion in the team pursuit. He also won the 1983 U.S. professional Individual Pursuit Championship, the 1984 Madison Cup (with partner Ian Jackson), the 1992 PA Mountain Bike Championship and many more road and criterium races at all levels. With a 23-year racing career, including 17 seasons at VPCC (1977-1993), “The Rocket” is known for his sportsmanship, dry sense of humor and versatile racing talent. He is also regarded as the first Pennsylvania native to become a successful pro cyclists in modern times. Notably, Jeff has been an Air Products Developmental Cycling Programs coach and is and inducted member of the Schuylkill County Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame.

2010

2010 Hall of Fame

Ian Jackson

Ian Jackson

Ian Jackson
From Melbourne, Ian “The General” Jackson was the first of many Australians to make the T-Town Velodrome his home. After racing in Belgium for three years, the rugged 22-year old quickly became a Velodrome crowd favorite. His cunning and speed earned him repeated wins on the track in 1975 through 1984, including the 1984 Madison Cup victory with teammate Jeff “The Rocket” Rutter. In 1981, Ian turned pro for America’s Panasonic/Shimano team where his winning style and Aussie accent made him an ideal spokesman for the renewal of pro cycling in America. In addition to his countless victories on the track, Ian won some of the most prestigious American road races and criteriums of the era. After retiring from pro racing, Ian served as the Veldorome’s Technical Director from 1985 to 1987. He continued to race competitively, winning two Masters National Road Championships in 1988 and 1998.
Ian Jackson

Dave Lettieri

Dave Lettieri
Dave Lettieri, from Scranton, Pennsylvania, is the first cyclist from the Air Products Developmental Cycling Program to compete in the Olympic games. This grassroots cycling program was instrumental in launching his career. After being coached in 1977 by Nelson Saldena and Jerry Ash, Dave went on to win multiple Pennsylvania State Track and Road Championships. In 1979, Dave was the Intermediate National Track Champion. In 1981, he won the Junior National Pursuit Championship in Trexlertown. In 1982, he won the Junior National Track Omnium and Individual Pursuit Championship. After leaving the junior ranks, his success followed him. In 1983, he won the National Team Pursuit Championship. In 1985, Dave placed fifth in the Team Pursuit at the World Championships in Italy, followed by a return to the World Championships in 1986 and 1987. Lettieri competed in the Goodwill Games in Moscow in 1986. In 1987, he won the National Team Pursuit Championship in Trexlertown. The same year, Dave’s gold medal for Team Pursuit at the Pan-American Games in Indianapolis earned him a spot on the USA Team Pursuit squad for the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. Following his racing career, Dave managed professional teams from 1992 through 1996, and was Lance Armstrong’s personal mechanic during the 2000 Tour de France. He currently resides in Santa Barbara, California, where he owns a popular bicycle shop.

2011

2011 Hall of Fame

Brian Drebber

Brian Drebber

Brian Drebber
Brian raced the inaugural Velodrome event on Oct. 12, 1975. The next spring he headed north from Richmond, Virginia to the land of track cycling in Trexlertown. In his first Velodrome racing season, Brian become the most improve rider of any category and went on to win the PA District Kilometer Championship. Brian also worked at the track in a position he describes as “Caretaker/Handyman.” he nearly single-handedly built the Velodrome’s first concession stand, press box and barn rooms. He also oversaw the infield and bridge construction-contributing to his nickname, “Ripsaw.” As the need for Velodrome announcing grew, Ripsaw’s talent was discovered. While in T-town building and fixing, he would talk profusely of tracking cycling. This lead to him being drafted as the regular Tuesday night, then Friday night Velodrome announcer. Brian was the voice for the Velodrome for 13 years. his career soon expanded to including commentating for all U.S. TV networks and cable sports channels. he announced at the Olympic and Pan-American games as well as the World Championships for 28 different sports. Brian now lives in Ball Ground, Georgia, where he continues with his broadcasting, rides motorcycles, tends to his garden and beehives.
Gene Samuel

Gene Samuel

Gene Samuel
Hailing from Trinidad and Tobago, Gene Samuel began competing at the Velodrome in 1989. Impressed with the track, Gene returned to T-town every summer for the next eight years until his retirement in 1997. Gene’s warrior-like racing style and flying bond ponytail earned him the moniker, “Geronimo.” His spectacularly smooth and fast come-from-behind rushes made “Geronimo” one of the Velodrome’s most popular riders of his decade. His T-Town victories include winning the Madison Cup in 1991 and 1992, both times with regular partner Shaun Wallace, and the Keirin Cup in 1992. Internationally, Gene finished third in the 1991 World Kilometer Championship, the best placing of any Trinidad rider in 33 years. He was the first rider to race the kilometer event using the full aero position in a world championship, a style copied by all serious contenders thereafter. Samuel was an eight-time Pan American Games medalist, a member of four Olympic Teams and has 478 career wins. He was named Sportsman of the year three times in his home country in 1986, 1987 and 1991. Gene now lives in Trinidad with his wife Rhonda-Lou and their two sons, Gino and Gevan. He owns and manages Geronimo’s Cycle and coaches full-time.

2012

2012 Hall of Fame

Marty Nothstein

Marty Nothstein

Marty Nothstein
Born and raised in Trexlertown, Marty “The Blade” Nothstein began his cycling career through the developmental programs at the velodrome and showed just how successful T-town’s community programs can bed. He has come to be regarded as the greatest track cyclist in the history of the United States, setting World and Olympic records on his way to over 35 U.S. National Championships, four Pan Am Games Championships, three World Championships an Olympic silver in the 1996 games in Atlanta, and Gold in Sydney in 2000. Nothstein’s 150 plus wins are a credit to his panache, passion, and drive to succeed. There was nothing like watching Nothstein race; his display of power and speed always brought crowds to their feet. Nothstein had an unwavering commitment to T-town. He never relocated for training, carruing out his “Rocky Balboa” type training in the Lehigh Valley. He proved that everything is necessary for success in cycling was available here. Nothstein truly epitomizes the best “end result” of the Velodrome and its developmental programs.
Pat McDonough

Pat McDonough

Pat McDonough
Pat McDonough’s career at T-Town began in 1978 when he represented the U.S. at the Junior World Championships, which were held at the Velodrome. Throughout his career he won an impressive total of seven U.S. National Championships. His crowning achievement was a Team Pursuit Silver Medal in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games. His career in cycling came full circle when he became the Executive Director of the Lehigh Valley Velodrome. He was instrumental in making T-town famous while reinforcing the venue’s role in the Lehigh Valley. Under McDonough’s leadership from 1989-2003, the Velodrome made the transition from a privately funded venue to a thriving private-public partnership. The Velodrome’s rapid growth during McDonough’s tenure brought many world-class competitions including the U.S. Cycling National Championships, the 1996 U.S. Olympic Trials, the 1997 UCI World Cup of Cycling and the 2001 Junior World Championships, to T-town.

2013

2013 Hall of Fame

Tanya Lindenmuth

Tanya Lindenmuth

Tanya Lindenmuth
Tanya Lindenmuth, originally from Bethlehem, PA, is a graduate of the Air Products Developmental Cycling Program, like so many other greats before her. Lindenmuth, a 2000 United States Olympic Team member, had many talents besides being a world class cyclist. She was a cyclist, model, and television host. Lindenmuth, unlike many Olympic Cyclists, did not have major sponsors and endorsements. The United States Cycling Federation provided her with much of her training equipment, coaching and transportation, allowing her to flourish as an Olympic Cyclist and pursue her many national championships and ride in the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Additionally accolades for the “uncontested queen of speed in the U.S.” include being named Female Athlete of the Year by USA Cycling in 1997, garnering a spot on the United States National Team in 1998 and winning a gold medal during the 2nd UCI World Cup Season. She once enthused, ” One thing I learned is to race in the moment, where I am. From watching Marty Nothstein seize the moment for the gold medal, I learned that when you see it, you have to take it.” The aforementioned sentiments epitomized the type of cyclist Tanya was.
Betsy Davis

Betsy Davis

Betsy Davis
Betsy Davis was the center’s first female Rider of the Year. She collected more than 300 victories, 19 national championships and was the United States men’s national team coach.

2014

2014 Hall of Fame

Cliff Halsey

Cliff Halsey

Cliff Halsey
One of the first riders in the United States to bolt his shoes to the pedals of his bike, Harold Clifford Halsey was a pioneer. Halsey, a famous American cyclist, was a hit with the ladies,halsey-230x300 standing over six feet tall with long blonde hair. Nicknamed ‘The Admiral,’ Halsey finished 3rd in the 1971 Pan-American games. Known for his sprinting, Halsey turned pro in 1971. Halsey won several Madison races at VPCC during his career and placed in the 1977 International Sprint Tournament in T-town. Halsey was a 1963 New Jersey State Champion, a member of the U.S. Army Cycling Team, Director of Encino Velodrome and Cycling Competition Director for the 1984 Los Angeles Cycling program throughout his illustrious career. Halsey remained a fan favorite for years at Valley Preferred Cycling Center and was one of the first big name riders at the facility, he also was a pioneer of the sport and of the facility. Halsey passed away on Nov. 11, 2003, but his legacy at VPCC will live forever.
Jim Alvord

Jim Alvord

Jim Alvord
Jim Alvord has been a contributor to VPCC for over 20 years. Starting his time in T-town as a rider, Alvord is a 40 year cycling veteran on both the road and the track. Alvord began his cycling career in 1974 while competing on the amateur circuit as a road bike racer. Alvord captured a silver medial in the Pennsylvania State Championships hat year, his first ever license road race. For over a decade, Alvord either won or placed in the top three in both the Pennsylvania State Spring and Kilo Championships. While his cycling career is something to be proud of, Alvord can perhaps be even more proud of his coaching career. For over 20 years, Alvord has been involved with the PeeWee Pedalers. Under Alvord’s leadership, the program has introduced thousands of young riders to the sport while teaching basic skills, bicycle safety, and having fun, all at the same time. Alvord can be seen on Saturday mornings throughout the summer teaching the youngsters of he PeeWee Pedalers program with his son, Jamie, who is a professional rider at VPCC.

2015

2015 Hall of Fame

Allen Bell

Allen Bell

Allen Bell
Allen Bell was as gritty as a rider as they come. The former high school wrestling state champion took that grit on to the velodrome, where he came to excel in the kilometer time trial. Bell set national records many times in this event and went on to win gold at the 1959 Pan-American Games in Chicago, Ill. along with competing in the 1959 Pan-Am Games, bell also competed in the 1956 Olympic Games in Rome. Bell was the winner of the first elite race at the Valley Preferred Cycling Center on the opening day in 1975 and competed in many Friday night events during the early seasons. Bell, now a member of the Century Road Club of America, won the 1985 Masters National Track Championship for the senior men 45+ omnium. In 1994, Bell was inducted into the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame for his extraordinary career that spanned nearly 30 years.

2016

2016 Hall of Fame

Bobby Phillips

Bobby Phillips
Bobby “The Baltimore Bullet” Phillips was destined to race bikes as both his parents competed on two wheels, however, it was his talent, determination, and dedication to the sport that has led him to be referred to as the most winning active bike racer in America. He won his first race in May of 1954 and never stopped, still competing on the national stage to this day. He has traveled around the globe to compete in national championships, criteriums, and Masters World Cups. During his stint in the Army, Bobby was a member of the U.S. Army Cycling team which was chosen to represent the U.S. Army at the 1967 Pan-American trials. Bobby also was a member of the U.S. Cycling Federation Board of Directors and was an official. Known for his lightning fast sprint, “The Bullet” always found a way to shoot himself to the front of the pack.
Allen Bell

Joe Saling

Joe Saling
Joe Saling wears many hats in the world of cycling. From racer, to club organizer, to announcer, he simply is a contributor to the sport. Saling began cycling back in 1956 and helped the now Valley Preferred Cycling Center take its first step as he was there on opening night for the first race. Over the decades, Saling has earned 20 national championships, six Masters Pan-American championships and eight Masters World Cup championships, just to highlight some of the hardware the New Jersey native has accumulated. Arguably his biggest contributions have come off the track as he, along with his wife Dottie, have been the driving force behind the success and longevity of the Somerset Wheelman, one of the most historic bicycling clubs in the country. Additionally, Saling announces more than 25 events each year, just adding to his impressive resume behind the microphone, which includes multiple national championships as well as Pan-American and Olympic trials. Regardless of what hat, or helmet, he was wearing on that particular day, Saling is known as an ambassador to the sport.
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