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Kim Geist: Finesse and Fury

Talk of the T-Town Podcast Show Art

Episode 6

Taking on new projects always means there’s a give and take with old.
But one thing that keeps me going is that, I’m an athlete at heart and I’m driven by goals.

– Kim Geist
MS, ACSM-EP, CSCS; World Champion Athlete. Cycling coaching,
strength & conditioning, nutritional analysis.

This week on Talk of the T-Town, Joan and Andy sit down with Kim Geist, multi-time world (team pursuit) and national champion as well as Owner and Operator of Kim Geist coaching and coach for Team T-Town. We discuss what’s next for Kim– Finesse and Fury by Kim Geist Coaching.

Kim’s website http://www.kimgeistcoaching.com

@kimgeistcoaching #kimgeistcoaching

https://www.facebook.com/KimGeistCoaching/


Transcript

Joan Hanscom:

Welcome to the Talk of the T-Town podcast, where we discuss all things track cycling. Broadcasting from the Valley preferred cycling center, I’m your host and executive director, Joan Hanscom, along with my cohost athletic director, Andy Lakatosh. So welcome to this week’s Talk of the T-Town podcast. I’m joined by my co-host Andy Lakatosh, who’s calling in again from sunny Southern California and our very special guest Kim Geist. Kim Geist is a Lehigh Valley native and began her track racing here, at T-Town in the Air Products community programs. And she went on to have an absolutely stellar professional racing career that included, not only being the 2018 and 2017 world champion in the team pursuit, world cup champion.

Joan Hanscom:

She was the number one ranked rider in the world in 2018 and 2015. In 2019, she was Pan-Am Games two time champion, a long team member of the 2016 Olympic team, 2015 world championship bronze medalist, and many U.S national champions among other things. But equally, if not more impressive, particularly given that she’s only just retired from the sport. Kim’s credentials include a Master’s in Applied Nutrition and a Bachelor’s in Sports and Exercise Science, and more certifications that you can shake a stick at. That’s a lot to achieve while racing internationally. And so we’re very lucky to have her. All of which has led us here today to a podcast, and her two recent announcements about launching the Kim Geist Academy and Finesse & Fury by Kim Geist Coaching which we all can’t wait to talk about. So Kim, welcome to the pod.

Kim Geist:

Thanks for having me.

Joan Hanscom:

Let’s get started with the thought that for a lot of athletes, retirement is a scary thing. And a lot of athletes struggle with what comes next. They struggle with leaving the international stage, but you, on the other hand seem to have charged headfirst into something pretty amazing and pretty impressive. So let’s start with the decision to retire when you were really at the top of your game, and about your future plans and goals for the two programs that you just announced,

Kim Geist:

Right. I’ve been retired a little over a year now. The decisions, I don’t think easy to make in the moment. The sport is something that you’re putting really your everything into, to close the door that was for me 23 years at that point, competing in cycling, that was certainly tough. But one thing I always kept in mind while I competing, is that I was never just a cyclist. So I was always, in some other role throughout my entire career. I was a student, I was starting a business, entrepreneur, growing a business, I was always doing something else simultaneously. So when I made the decision to retire, I had a very clear path of something that I could move into. And that was very comforting, that it wasn’t necessarily a huge void that was gonna be left in my life. I was going to be involved in the sport in other ways. And putting that much, I’m in that much energy just in a different aspect of the sport.

Joan Hanscom:

Yeah. I mean, I think that’s really important for people to understand. I’ve talked to sports psychologist about it, and to have an identity outside of life as a competitor, is really challenging for folks. But I think that goes back to the point we made earlier, that you were getting a master’s degree and all of this training while you were an internationally ranked athlete. Something that I think young athletes should think about, right? That you can’t just be a hundred percent wrapped up into this identity as an athlete, because that day comes and it comes for everybody at some point.

Joan Hanscom:

So it’s important, I think for our listeners to understand it, particularly the juniors that you coach that, “Hey, look you’ve gotta run on parallel tracks and always be thinking about what comes next, perhaps.” So that takes us really to the Kim Geist Academy and the Finesse & Fury programs. Tell us about that. Tell us about, we’ve seen the teasers, we’ve seen the announcements on Instagram and on social channels and it’s on your website, but tell us a little bit more. Tell us about really what you hope to accomplish with the Academy and with Finesse & Fury.

Kim Geist:

Sure. So Finesse & Fury by Kim Geist Coaching, is really something that I was thinking about and it came about from all those years of experience and really seeing it all. All the things, good, bad, great, and ugly. And the Kim Geist Academy, really grew out of recognizing a need for that program. Recognizing that renting a facility and being on other teams schedules and not being able to really be detail oriented with that program, that a facility where I had complete control over schedule over equipment, over access, that was really going to be important.

Kim Geist:

And Finesse & Fury itself, really recognizing the positive aspects of athlete development, especially at the [inaudible 00:06:20] level, being able to recognize that I was a good person to be able to put boats together, and at the same time as I was going through the process, recognizing some of the things that just weren’t working. That weren’t working for me, that weren’t working for my teammates, that left people out, that weren’t supportive of sort of the athlete journey. So being able to recognize those things that I wanted to avoid and sort of this comprehensive coaching program for endurance back cyclists.

Joan Hanscom:

I think that’s a really interesting potentially controversial topic, but I think it’s one that needs to be talked about. What are some of those things? What are some of the things, the pitfalls that you’re hoping to avoid, that’s going to delineate, this program from what you potentially saw, personally firsthand or secondhand with your teammates. Talk a little bit about that, because I think that’s important for people to understand

Kim Geist:

Sure. The negative aspects and the positive as well. Probably going through the main points of the program is easiest way to describe that. So I’ve recognized that coaching based in experience as well as education is the best way to package coaching. So I’ve had experience with coaches who have been in the sport and have gotten to a very high level, but the drawback from my perspective with that, is that they have difficulty in explaining why we’re doing what we’re doing. And I as an athlete, by and all that much more, to something that I know the reasons why it will work. Not because it worked for you or because it worked for another athlete, but because here’s the science, here’s the act, here’s the studies, that describe exactly why we’re doing what we’re doing.

Kim Geist:

And on the flip side, I’ve worked with coaches in the past, who have great education but not all that much experience in the sport. So in that case, we’re looking at oftentimes numbers only, and case in point towards the end of my career, I kept saying, “I’m tired, I’m just tired.” And working with coaches who were only looking at the numbers, the response to that was, “Well, your numbers say, you’re not tired.” Well, I am the athlete. I’m telling you what I feel. You’re unable as a coach to tell me what I feel. That’s great that the numbers say one thing, but it needs to be balanced with actual experience in the sport. There’s reasons that say, the coach with the experience can recognize that I am feeling tired.

Joan Hanscom:

Right. And so much of that’s communication too, right? Like understanding and trust. And if you have the right coaching relationship, that feedback, a good coach in my estimation knows when an athlete says I can do more and also knows when they really can’t. And when the message comes that I need a break. People need to listen to that and I’m sure it’s challenging with elite level athletes who always want to go, who don’t want to admit that they need rest. I think that’s a really important point that you’re raising as well, that when an athlete gives feedback, you at some point have to respect that feedback. And there’s a fine line between trying to get more out of an athlete and understanding where they really are and trusting them to give you truthful feedback.

Kim Geist:

Right? Yeah. I think there’s a difference. If I would have said, “You know what? I’m just so tired.” And that was met with, “Okay We know, but we need you to little bit more right now and here’s why. Instead of simply dismissing the statement. So I think there’s absolutely a balance there as far as coaching goes. And I think that comes from having the experience and being in the athlete shoes, and being able to actually look at the data and then make an informed decision.

Joan Hanscom:

Andy, when you get that kind of feedback from your athletes, what’s your experience been as an athlete, but also with the athletes that you’re coaching. I think it’s an important point that we don’t want to let go.

Andy Lakatosh:

No, it’s definitely comes down to really being in tune with your athletes, willing the biggest things for us in… Well, elite and age group athletes winds up being, are they rolling in all the variables that actually impact it? So as soon as something goes off track, I instantly try, someone gets really tired or they’re blown out or they’re super fatigued, I try to diagnose. Okay, is it just isolated to the training that we’re prescribing? Or is there a sleep deficiency or a nutrition deficiency, and really trying to help athletes hone in and figure that stuff out, because the more we check all those boxes and make sure those things are covered, the more we’re able to really push things to the limit. Right?

Andy Lakatosh:

I don’t think that pushing, going to your limit is not only the physical on the bike was I about to pass out or vomit I mean, that is a part of it too, but the ability to get up and repeat day after day and have the motivation to do it. So it’s definitely a conversation you have to listen to. And then I always try to get the athlete involved in, okay, what are all the variables? Are we accounting for everything? What can we do to solve this besides just, I need some more time off. Or is there emotional fatigue? I mean, that’s another huge part of it, too.

Joan Hanscom:

Life TSS. I like to call it for the master’s ladies in the room. It’s who don’t just train full-time. We have jobs and life stress, So there is life TSS. Andy brings up an interesting thing though, which is sort of this holistic approach, right? It’s not just training, it’s so many other aspects of what it takes to prepare as an athlete. And if I’m not mistaken, you’re taking that very holistic approach with the Kim Geist Academy as well. And offering the athletes that are training there, a lot more than just on the bike workouts. So tell us a little bit more about the Kim Geist Academy and what’s going to happen there and what it’s offering and what it’s really designed to do.

Kim Geist:

Right? So with the finesse and fury program, the use of resource partners is another key aspect. So outside of the Academy itself, one of the things recognized in this 20 plus year journey was that, I as a coach don’t know it all, and I’m not an expert in everything, but along the way have had really good contacts with other professionals in aspects of performance. So aligning with someone who has a greater depth of knowledge in nutrition, for example, who’s registered diet, a sports psychologist and massage therapist. So those things are, things that I can have a direct line of communication with those other professionals. So I can learn from my end and help to implement what they’re doing with athletes, and also have a resource that I can easily pass on to an athlete. So it takes the stress out of doing that research and finding someone on their own to work with, of course not dictating that they need to utilize that resource because we’re all different in all work with people in different ways, the resources at the Academy, strength and conditioning, equipment and training, indoor cycling.

Kim Geist:

And we have the ability to do meetings and presentations. So I can, of course potentially bring resource partners in and present on, and work with athletes on their specialties. But I can also present to this group, the community, athletes within Kim Geist Coaching, on topics that I’m an expert in.

Joan Hanscom:

Right. And that, what you’re describing, and Andy jump in here if I’m wrong, but what you’re really describing is high-performance, right? Which is sort of a commitment to excellence across all aspects of an athlete’s preparation not just writing programs. And that’s what true high-performance programs should be, right? It’s that attention to detail and excellence across all aspects. And if you can’t provide it yourself, you have the confidence to hand it off to other people. And at least that’s how I interpret what high-performance really is, it’s that attention to excellence everywhere. And I think that high-performance lifestyle as people like to call it, is applicable to all athletes, whether it’s juniors, elites, masters. But Andy you’re sort of living a bit of that right now out in LA. What do you think about that?

Andy Lakatosh:

Yeah. I mean, that’s… It is high performance or higher performance, right? For whoever the athlete is and trying to roll all those things in and going to the experts in the field to get that last 1% out of everything. I mean, I realized after 2012 for myself as an athlete, we were fighting an unfair fight. We didn’t have great USA Cycling engaged with every level of athlete, the way British Cycling did, strength coaches and nutritionists and sports psychologists, which is another huge part of it. And I started to seek those out. Those experts out for myself and much like Kim, whoever you have in your personal racing career just kind of rolls over as partners into your coaching career.

Andy Lakatosh:

And I think that’s really great. But there’s definitely… Kim touched on it a little bit, an ego with coaching because a lot of us used to be athletes but where like you start out and, “I know everything, I know exactly how to do this. I can do it better than everybody else.” And it’s funny because when you go through the USA Cycling Coaching Clinics, the level two clinic was full of egos. I don’t know how we got that many people in one room together. It was impressive, the level two clinic. And then you get to the level one, and the very first opening line of the week was, there is no silver bullet, nobody knows everything. And it was all about collaboration, right? And some of the greatest evolutions that I’ve gotten with athletes, when you just get stuck and you’re like, I’m doing everything I know how to do, but for this athlete, it’s not progressing.

Andy Lakatosh:

Is actually just like peer group discussions, right? I have a handful of coaches, both domestic and international that I bounce ideas off of them. Kim, I’m not sure if this is your process too, but it’s like I try to take ideas or concepts or objectives from what other coaches or other programs are doing, and figure out how to translate that into what I’m doing. Not just the straight, “Oh, they did standing starts in X gear, so now I’m going to do standing starts in X gear, and that’s going to make athletes faster.”

Andy Lakatosh:

There’s definitely more art and science and blending of it and really interpreting why someone’s doing something and how that fits, than just straight blanket jumping into it. And that’s where coming all the way back to it, having experts in the fields that you can communicate with and work with, nothing’s worse than the strength coach with someone and they’re like, “No, I got this, just leave me alone.” It’s like, well, I gather that you got this, but this is a team thing. This is high performance like you said.

Joan Hanscom:

Yeah. I could listen to you guys talk about this all day, because I think it’s fascinating because I’m not one of you. I just, as a person who isn’t elite, you just find it fascinating to hear all of the things that go into it. And that really drive excellence in our sport. And I think it’s fascinating. I could listen to you guide for a long time, just talk about that. But Kim, you’ve got a lot more going on and stuff that, laughed. So and Andy made this point too, people all have a lot on their plates these days, right? And we’re all juggling a lot of things. And then when I said to you, “You have a lot on your plate.” You’re like, “I have a pressure cooker.” Or was it a Crock-Pot something like that. That was like-

Kim Geist:

It was a stockpot [crosstalk 00:20:02].

Joan Hanscom:

So you’re not just doing the Kim Geist Academy and Kim Geist Finesse & Fury. You are doing a lot of other things. You are coaching our team T- Town kids, our team T-Town program, which I think is thriving under your coaching. You are leading our women’s Wednesdays program, which I have harped on I think in every episode, how pleased I am to see our women’s participation here at T-Town growing. And I’ll say it again for those in the back who might’ve missed it the first 10 times I said it. We’re at 70, 30 participation, here at T-Town, and that’s something that I want to see, continue to grow and you’ve been an incredibly important part of that with women’s Wednesdays. And now we are getting ready to have our first annual women’s weekend coming up in may of this year, assuming COVID allows us to do these things. So how are you doing it? How are you staying sane I guess, but keeping all the balls in the air. And doing it all very well from what I can tell.

Kim Geist:

Sure. Taking on new projects always means there’s a give and take with old. But one thing that keeps me going is that, I’m an athlete at heart and I’m driven by goals. So for me to wake up in the morning and know that I have a whole heck of a lot of things to accomplish, that gets me super excited and excited to do things well. And really I’ve, maybe not a whole lot of people realize this, but I’ve been coaching in my own business now for it’ll be 12 years, early summer. So behind the scenes, I have a good organization, a good infrastructure for myself to be organized and focused and very efficient. So that’s really how I accomplish all those different things, but being involved with things like Women’s Wednesdays and team T-Town, it’s a really nice balance for me.

Kim Geist:

So yes, I’m going in this new direction that’s, as we’ve said, high performance oriented, but that does get stressful. It’s a high pressure situation. People have big goals and they expect that they’re going to meet them. And it’s a nice balance for me to take a step back and work with athletes on the beginner level too. There’s nothing more rewarding than seeing a woman in Women’s Wednesdays, go from absolute fear of death in her eyes at looking at the track and this bike with no brakes, to 20 minutes later Or coming off the track and being, “Whoa, sign me up for this thing. This is so awesome.” That sort of thing gets me really excited and really motivated to do all that I’m doing.

Joan Hanscom:

Kind of going along that line, we just had a conversation on an earlier pod with Lynn Monroe sort of emphasizing that at her level with Cycling Australia, she’s very sort of unique at that high level of coaching in the sprint world. And I’m not sure that there’s a female equivalent to Lynn right now in the endurance world of that really high level coaching and high performance. And it’s exciting that you’re going there that you’ve been much like Lynn on this trajectory of really being at the highest level of this sport. And has that ever been one of your ambitions? To be like Lynne, a bit of a trailblazer in that space… I just finished up the TrainingPeaks Coaching Academy thing that they do every year as coaching summit. And one of the things that was talked about, is how few women are actually in the sport coaching and you’re obviously moving into that high-performance space. Has that ever crossed your mind, that you’re doing something that is a bit trailblazerly? Or you just doing your thing?

Kim Geist:

It cross my mind yes, but I’d say it’s more just doing my thing.

Joan Hanscom:

Yeah. Right on.

Kim Geist:

Yeah. Within, sport within life but in my mind, gender boundaries is as optimistic as I’d like to be, or minimal. So I’m just another person who’s the right person to fill the niche. And I’m going to do the best of my ability, whether a female or male.

Joan Hanscom:

So Andy had flagged this up for me in conversation, and Andy, you are the same as Kim in this regard. So I’m going to let you talk about it, but you started here at T-Town. And now you’re here still at T-Town in this complete lifecycle. So why don’t you both talk about what that means to you as having been through this, again this started as a youth, like you’re coaching now at team T-Town and racing here, and then coming back to coaching here. I’d love to hear you both talk about that because I think it’s pretty cool. And it says something very special about the place.

Andy Lakatosh:

Well, my first question to Kim is so because we came up just a few years apart from each other, and Kim would have to race my sister every other year. So that was how we knew of the legend of Kim Geist. Like, “Damn we have to race Kim this year. This is going to be a really hard year.” But I started in Pee-wee’s and then went through everything. Did you do Pee-wee’s as well? Or did you pick up Air Products partway through?

Kim Geist:

I started the youngest age at Air Products. Yep. Ran the track like-

Andy Lakatosh:

It’s a funny transition. I remember I think 2004, I would have been 19. I coached my first Air Products class on like, I mean who would have been Pat McDonald’s gave me and Mike Friedman, the worst two o’clock in the afternoon session to coach in July. And I’m like, “I have no idea what to tell these kids to do. I barely know how to ride the track.” And I think that’s one of the things about going through the programs and then coming back to coach the programs, that’s actually a great… If there were only a bigger employment pool with like elite coaches down the road, we could be the university of like how to start from, I’ve never coached anything, to you can be coaching world champions like yourself and other people that pass through.

Andy Lakatosh:

And it’s such a… I remember when I started private coaching too, I was completely fearful of taking money from people. I’m like, “I don’t know what I’m doing. I can’t guarantee you, you’re going to get where you get to.” And now I’m like, “Oh yeah, you want to do something, I know boom exactly what to do.” It’s funny how that evolves. Did you have a similar thing or what was your transition with the community programs and experience and coming back and coaching? How does that make you feel?

Kim Geist:

It has been quite the process for sure. Coaching, that thing is always something that I wanted to do though. So, yes, and starting out, I think my experience was very similar. I remember being an assistant coach in one of the Air Products programs, and just being during the headlights, “You want me to do what? These people are going to listen to me? I know what I’m talking about, but really they’re going to buy it?” So being able to now, Gosh, I probably did my first Air Products assistant coaching like most 15 or so. So all these years later to be able to look back and then see how far I’ve come as a coach, through these programs and through my own programs, it’s a pretty neat experience.

Andy Lakatosh:

What’s your… Have you coached… So you do JPA, actually, you and I started JPA together back in 2012. We did the very first iteration. It was just like a summer nationals prep course. And of course, like both Kim and I attention to detail, we went way over the top. I mean, we did standing start day and we had like two video cameras. We had people split into three groups. We were… And that was very early on in the, Hey let’s play coaching idea. What’s been your favorite, because I love coaching the community programs because I feel like globally, the lifestyle that I get to lead and the career that I have, and I’m very happy with, is all thanks to the track, right? I don’t think of it in terms of like cycling because you can cycle anywhere or in terms of a particular person. To me, I owe it to… I owe my livelihood to the track.

Andy Lakatosh:

So it’s a real sense of pride and enjoyment to me to give back and be a big contributor to the place that it is now and the place that it’ll be in three, five, 10, 20 years from now. But I definitely loved BR the most. BRL was the absolute most fun to coach. And I was wondering if you had a favorite program or anything that stands besides JPA, because I’m sure the kids are gonna listen to this and be like, “Kim you better like us the most.” But what’s been your favorite program?

Kim Geist:

I think I would agree as both, an athlete in the program and as a coach that BRL is most enjoyable. It’s really teaching these kids some really vital lessons on how to race at that point. So you’ve gone from, let’s just learn about track bikes and the velodromes, to actually putting things together and seeing things click and the light bulbs going on. And that’s a really neat process. And really, I can’t say enough positive things about all of the development programs at the velodrome. When I was formulating the new program, Finesse & Fury, I had to really sit down and seriously think about, where do these athletes really come from? Do I have a pool? Will that pool be there in the future? And the answer was yes, that I believe the programs at the Arabella velodrome are that strong, and will continue to be that strong, that if these riders have the same experience that I did and they have somewhere to go and appropriate home to continue their goals and their dreams that will be successful.

Joan Hanscom:

That’s super cool. We’ll keep doing the programs for you Kim. That’s our goal. The goal here is to really keep the focus on growing what we do here and making more Kim’s and Andy’s, if we can, happy Kim’s and Andy’s. We want happy athletes coming out of the track and sending them into programs like the ones you two have that do take them to that next level. I think, one of the really important things to do that life cycle that you’re talking about is that, “Yes, maybe they start in Pee-Wee’s, but you have to populate bike racing outside of your own ecosystem by nature of what bike racing is, right? You have to have other programs thriving and being strong for there to be competition.

Joan Hanscom:

And so to me, it’s really important that there is that next step for folks and that athletes who come through these programs then know where the right home for them to go is in the next step, right? Because if everything is inside, it doesn’t work. You have to have a place for people to go outside of what your own programs are, as that next step of the evolution so that there are people to compete against. Like you have to… Competition only works when there’s more than one place for people to grow as athletes. And I think that’s a point that can’t get made enough times, is that sometimes people want to hold things really close and own everything. And when you want to own everything, you end up stifling everything. And so the goal here is really to almost be finishing school for bike racers, right?

Joan Hanscom:

We’ll move you to a certain point. And then there are all these really great programs around here that we can be a feeder system for. And then hopefully that just grows and grows and multiplies itself and we do see a 2024 version of Kim Andy, and a 2028 version of Kim and Andy. And we see a whole lot of people like me who are just enthusiastic about the sport, who will be thrilled to watch that process unfold in front of us and we can cheer. But it’s all part of creating this really healthy ecosystem that we want to grow here at T-Town. And there are a lot of really qualified and great people around that are doing that hard work. So it’s pretty cool to be part of.

Andy Lakatosh:

Joan I think you touched on a really important part there, right? Because it is an ecosystem, but I think one of the things that makes T-Town most successful, and I’ve definitely said this before, is that the track does own and have the vested interest in so much of that initial grassroots development and growth and feeding into our programs. And I definitely think that’s a shortcoming for a lot of other venues, is that they’re just a venue that things happen inside of, instead of being a living, breathing thing that is invested in getting people on bikes, because someone’s got to do the mass, let’s just get people to ride bikes and ride a velodrome, because it’s going to continue to reduce unless people will graduate to that next level. But when you look at the number of high-level programs that there are in T-Town that are focused on bike racing, it overflows into the entire nation, right?

Andy Lakatosh:

If there were three other T-Towns in the size of our country, we might find a lot more of the Kim’s and the Chloe Dygert’s and the Jen Valente’s in these phenomenal athletes. And I definitely see it, some of the other tracks, I mean, the track here is close, but it’s a building and it’s a track and they organize the usage of it. But without that ownership of, especially the grassroots stuff and the organization of the racing, the long-term vision just doesn’t get executed, everything becomes short-term. And I know you and I don’t have a really strong long-term vision of where we want the programs and the racing to go to. And I think that that’s absolutely crucial. I think that’s what makes T-Town to, me that’s the primary thing that makes T-Town so special. That plus racing outdoors under the lights on a Friday night in the summer, there’s really nothing bad… I mean, why do you think I’m riding? I just want to get one or two more goes at it.

Joan Hanscom:

So that’s funny because Andy is training real hard right now. Yesterday, he was texting me his power numbers which I will not share, because those are his power numbers, but he was texting me updates which I’m always happy to see. But Kim, are we ever going to see you up on the track again, or is that done? I know last year we were talking at the crit across the street. For those of you who don’t know, there’s a Thursday night crit that happens here across the street from the track that’s pretty spicy sometimes. And Kim had just been saying that she was retiring and I was like, “Oh, you’re going to miss it.” And you were like, “No. Not going to miss it. I’ve got to do other things now.” Where’s your head on that now?

Kim Geist:

Yeah. I still feel the same way. When I retired, part of the factor was I really felt very confident that I had exhausted my potential. It was the correct time to stop. I will never again be that fast ever in my life. And trying to get up and compete again, I don’t think I would take enjoyment from it. I experienced nearly every single thing I wanted to do in this sport. There’s just nothing left. I find much more joy and being able to help other people achieve what they’re working on at this moment. Not to say, I’ll never pin the race number on and go out and have fun or ride in a race to help someone else out to coach them along. But as far as big goals and the bike racing, I feel very comfortable that will not happen.

Andy Lakatosh:

But that’s where my question was going to be because you and Bobby Lee are two of the most fit, retired cyclists I’ve ever seen in my entire life. You guys ride so much and you got to have form. So as race director and staff for the racing here, absolutely. I’m going to try and find a way to beat you guys and putting a number on and riding Madison flying lap or Madison cup, or hopping on a… Just having fun because that’s… When I look back at all of the things that I did, I can definitely say rider of the year is right up there at the top. For me, that was a big pride thing. And it wasn’t so much the win, it was more the experience and those memories of those nights. And that’s some of the best memories that I have and I love it. And so I can’t wait to get out there and race again. And I hope to see Kim out there racing with me when I do, for fun of course.

Kim Geist:

For fun, yes.

Joan Hanscom:

Well, Kim you said there were some fun things that you hadn’t gotten to do because you were so focused on racing. Did you do any of those or did COVID screw it all up?

Kim Geist:

Oh, I packed in a ton early on and then COVID happened and that slowed down dramatically. But yes, there’s so many things that I would just say, I don’t feel like a normal person. There’s all these normal people things out there that I’ve never done in my life. Now as the time I need to do these.

Joan Hanscom:

So when COVID is over, what’s the first thing you’re going to do, of that list of normal people things that you’ve never done?

Kim Geist:

Oh, I cheque some money off. A lot are actually outdoor things. So I haven’t been getting those in sort of outdoor country things. A prime example is, I’ve never gone on a hike before.

Joan Hanscom:

Oh, wow.

Kim Geist:

Not like all the time. Yeah. Right. Oh, wow.

Joan Hanscom:

Yeah, that one isn’t oh, well for me. That one I’ll give you a formal wow on. Well, right odd, okay. I get it. I did not realize the extent to which you had not done normal people things.

Kim Geist:

Yeah. I tried out some other sports, which would definitely not be my future Olympic sports. I did shooting and kayaking and horseback riding.

Joan Hanscom:

Oh, wow.

Andy Lakatosh:

So talk about random sports and cyclists. I have to share this one because I just spoke to him the other week. Kim, do you remember Kit Carson from out here?

Kim Geist:

I do, yeah.

Andy Lakatosh:

So I was catching up with him and he was saying how pre COVID out here. He was in a Dodgeball League, a competitive Dodgeball League. And I was like, “You were barely coordinated enough to ride a bike, how did you play Dodgeball?” He’s like, “Oh, I broke fingers, I rolled my ankle, I tripped over myself all the time, first one out.” And I was like, “Okay. You know that sounds like a cyclist trying to do a normal sport. Okay. Go back as you were.” So yeah. hand-eye coordination sports are not high on the list of things I’ll be doing after cycling.

Joan Hanscom:

But if you did, you would be 100% full on.

Andy Lakatosh:

I would wind up with broken hands and twisted ankles and the whole thing.

Joan Hanscom:

Alright. Well, we have persuaded, Maura, who I’ve been dying to get more integrated into the pod than just being our engineer, sound engineer to jump in as part of our production now. And so this is the time which I’m going to toss it to Maura and put you on the spot, Kim, with the traditional asking of the wacky podcast questions to wrap things up. So with no further delay, Maura hit Kim with your wacky questions.

Maura Beuttel:

All right. So I have a list pulled up on my computer and we’ll go with some questions about food because I’m hungry. First up, do you consider cereal to be a soup?

Kim Geist:

No.

Joan Hanscom:

Because it’s in a bowl.

Kim Geist:

Of course.

Maura Beuttel:

Right.

Kim Geist:

I see where you’re going there, but no.

Maura Beuttel:

Alright. Next step, is a hot dog a sandwich?

Kim Geist:

Oh gosh. You have no idea how hot of a topic this was and say the last quad on the national team. Every single dinner, this would come up. No, I did not personally consider it a sandwich.

Maura Beuttel:

Okay. And if you don’t consider it a sandwich, what do you consider it to be then?

Kim Geist:

A hot dog?

Joan Hanscom:

I would say it’s more consistent with a taco than it is with a sandwich.

Kim Geist:

Now we’re splitting hairs.

Maura Beuttel:

All right. Do you think an animal Cracker is more of a Cracker or cookie?

Kim Geist:

Cookie, it’s sweet. I love animal crackers by the way. Good question.

Maura Beuttel:

Solid snack. All right. Last question. How do you feel about cilantro? I know a lot of people think it tastes like soap.

Kim Geist:

Really? I enjoy cilantro. Now I won’t be able to eat it without thinking it tastes like soap. But I do enjoy cilantro.

Joan Hanscom:

I could see Andy shaking his head. And I don’t know if that means he is pro cilantro or are anti cilantro, but-

Andy Lakatosh:

It does not taste like soap. Those are things you can never unhear. I don’t know where that came from.

Maura Beuttel:

I think it tastes like soap. That’s just me.

Joan Hanscom:

I think there is a genetic component to cilantro that you either have the taste buds for it or you don’t genetically. And on that note, we will wrap up the tack of the detail podcast for this week and offer a very sincere thank you for spending time with us today, Kim. We wish you all the best of luck with the Finesse & Fury program and with the Kim Geist Academy and of course, with everything you’re doing with us here at the track and yeah, you start today with teen T-Town back in the gym so get at it.

Kim Geist:

We will do that.

Joan Hanscom:

Thanks everybody. Have a great day.

Kim Geist:

This has been the talk of the T-Town podcast with host Joan Hanscom and Andy Lakatosh. Thanks for joining us for this week’s episode, brought to you by B Braun medical Inc. Head on over to our website, the velodrome.com, where you can check out the show notes and subscribe. So you’ll never miss an episode.